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, the notion of americans checking the news on their phones or going to cnn or watching c-span. these things were cultivated in that period sauternes out pulitzer played a historically significant role and the fascinating life that made for great reading but the influence he yielded is with us today. the reason people don't remember pulitzer today as much is in some ways his accomplishment is so happenstance. we're so used to what it is. in the nineteenth century, printing was the internet. i can book a ticket now or everyday -- all commonplace things we don't think it's such a great deal and in some way i am not sure americans remember who morgan was or who rockefeller was or who carnegie was but we drive across a bridges made with steel, that is the carnegie gift, using cars powered by oil, all the world that rockefeller built and using a financial system built on morgan and consuming news built on a system developed and created by people like pulitzer. pulitzer was born in the 1840s and came to the united states as a mercenary soldier to fight in the vietnam-the civil war. they went to re
of americans, you know, checking the news on their phones or going to cnn or watching c-span. these are all things ever cultivated in that time. so it turns out that pulitzer not only played a historic the significant role in the 19th century, led a fascinating life which makes for great reading, but the influence he wielded is still with us today. and the reason people don't remember pulitzer today is because in some ways his accomplishments as a happenstance now. in the 19th century printing was the internet. we all go, well, i can book a ticket or have this bill gadget and every day we explain. and so the idea of getting news today quickly and easily are all commonplace things, and we don't think it is such a big deal in evaluating it, and in some way and not so sure all americans will remember who morgan was or who rockefeller was or who carnegie was, yet we drive across bridges made with steel. that is the carnegie gift. we used cars powered by oil. that is a world that rockefeller built, and we use a financial system built by morgan, and we are consuming is built on a system that was
of swiss cheese and as the cnn sensation, run making fun of me because we were changing for the highest standard. it became the story of government run amok. anyhow, it is very important because it helps with the slicing machines and the swiss cheese industry. i'm so proud of that one. anyhow, the standards are things we work in collaboration with industry and so we are always anxious for industry to come up with innovations in standards that we help oversee. so that is a partnership, though we are always working on. >> i would just add, in order for partnerships to work, there has to be a constructive conversation and unfortunately, all too often, folks will be encouraging conflict instead of collaboration. and so, yesterday i had a great conversation with leaders in the organic world who are basically making the case that her can ask are different than general commodities. and because they are different, the systems we have the usda, where we try to apply insurance regulatory systems may not recognize the uniqueness of her can ask and that we really need to be thinking differently in
account through payroll deduction. those who participate too often how contribution rate too low. cnn plans need to encourage higher purchasing contributions. i may suggest three easy ways to do so. change the employer match. a typical plan is 50% up to 6% of pay. 6% are marching to plan consider and notched a 30% to 10% of pay would cost the employer for every employer at or about 10% in this case a financial incentives for 10% of pay but no increase cost to the employer. to encourage employers to adopt a higher contribution rate under enrollment. the widespread adoption following the act of 2006 has been a clear victory for public policy at the typical default contribution rate is 3% of falls well short of what is needed to save. we know from extensive research and the employees persist at the default. the solution is
of cnn who together have a wonderful interview with clinton yesterday. thank you. over to elise. [applause] we have a lot of distinguished guests in the audience. the deputy chief of mission for the embassy of lebanon. a lot of people who care about syria and looks to be a lively discussion this evening. in august, 2011 secretary of state hillary clinton called for the president bashar al-assad to step down for the sake of the syrian people. at that time about 2,000 people were killed. today that number of u.n. estimates has risen to more than 60,000 syrian is dead, hundreds of thousands of refugees have fled to turkey and jordan and iraq pleasing burdens on those countries, close to 2 million more, more than half have been displaced inside syria. what started as a brave stand has moved into a civil war with opposition forces becoming more radicalized, some of them would say infiltrated by extremist forces with links to al qaeda. the conflict threatens to destabilize the entire region and become a battleground for the proxy war some might say of competing interest. the and ratio
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5